How organisations kill ideas

Tim Kastelle has a great post about how organisations can help to foster new ideas or – more often – kill them off. This quote particularly caught my eye:

Many managers like to run a tight ship that is focused on the task at hand—all business and no chit chat.  Yet Pentland’s research has found that the most important predictor of success in a group is the amount—not the content—of social interaction.  It is exposure to peer activity that drives learning and changes in behavior.

It’s from this post by Greg Satell, referencing a piece of research I think I’ve mentioned before somewhere. Essentially, we underestimate the value of coffee breaks. I often see groups sliding into a woraholic pattern of demanding meetings be productive; and the effort to be effective makes them ineffective.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>