Shared Space

Fascinating post at the Intraspec blog, spotted by Dick Richards.

When drivers no longer have the security of kerbs and traffic signals or signage their behavior shifts accordingly; they exercise greater caution and restraint, becoming more observant and psychologically attuned to pedestrains. Less delivers more…

When customer service reps no longer have the security of scripted words and actions (or whatever else they depend upon for security), their behavior shifts accordingly; they exercise greater caution and restraint, becoming more observant and psychologically attuned to customers. Less delivers more…

Here’s the underlying BBC article – can naked roads kill speed?

5 thoughts on “Shared Space

  1. Jack Yan

    Makes total sense. A few years ago, we had a power outage. No traffic lights operated in this area. Yet there were no accidents. People were considerate to one another at intersections.

    Reply
  2. Pete Smith

    Shared space initiatives take no account of people who are blind, partially sighted or have dual sensory loss. The whole concept is based upon drivers and the car rather than everyones safety.

    If you can’t see, how do you know where the safe environment (pavement) ends and the dangerous environment (road) starts? If you do not have this information, how can you problem solve!

    Reply
  3. Johnnie Moore

    Interesting point Peter, I don’t know how Shared Space road initiatives take account of those with sensory loss. I’d be surprised if this has not been thought through but I’m not an expert.

    There’s a wider point for anyone advocating change in any system: which is the need to remain highly sensitive to unintended consequences of even the most apparently wise changes.

    Reply

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