Smarter conversations

hughsmarter.jpg

Two days ago I said

I yearn for simpler ideas more lightly held.

Or some nice poetry maybe.

Well I wouldn’t call Hugh‘s cartoon poetry exactly but it comes close. Here’s the Extended Edition of Hugh’s argument:

If you’re in the advertising/marketing business, the issue isn’t about blogs or the internet, or all the “marketing is dead” rants you may hear in the blogosphere.

Sure, blogs make markets smarter, the internet makes markets smarter, but so do a lot of other things.

The issue is about how smarter your market is becoming, and how well you are able you to adapt. More importantly, it’s how well you can help your clients to adapt. Succeed and thrive. Fail and die. Again, it isn’t rocket science.

[PERHAPS:] “Smarter Conversations” is a big piece of the puzzle…

For me, there’s no perhaps.

As I said in a comment to Hugh, “YES, Smarter Conversations. I like this idea because it addresses the quality of the conversation. And it relates to all the conversations inside an organisation as well as those with customers.

For me, smarter would have to mean more assertive, direct, honest, heartfelt etc. Not smart as in smart-alec.

On days when I’m feeling more than usually bored of branding and all the branding books and models, I think getting people to talk better (I won’t dare say authentically to you) is what needs to happen.”

Is this absolutely true? No, of course not; I’m remembering what I said about lightly held, too.

2 thoughts on “Smarter conversations

  1. hugh macleod

    Well, there’s no real “perhaps” for me either, Johnnie… I just was using the word in that nice, uncommitted, British way. Circumlocution etc.

    Is Saatchi’s after our scalps yet?

    Reply
  2. Tom Guarriello

    The “lightly held” part is important. Keeping ideas kind of “bouncing” in a conversation is one of the characteristics that make it feel alive, vibrant and creative. Tightly held ideas are closed and don’t leave others any room to breathe. A priori, fait accompli, just a matter of getting other to “see the light.” Or, in management gibberish speak, just have to get their “buy in.”

    Reply

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