Vodka selling by word-of-mouth

Jackie Huba found this article: A cut above from the Sydney Morning Herald. To launch its new Vodka brand in Australia Absolut have ditched conventional advertising in favour of word-of-mouth.

Absolut has taken out a short lease on two pubs – one in Sydney’s Surry Hills the other in Melbourne’s St Kilda – hired bands DJs and put on a photographic exhibition on life in five state capitals. Visitors to the Absolut Cut bar will get a free bottle of Cut and eventually the public will be given a chance to contribute their photos, generating what Absolut hopes will be a viral element to the campaign.

The word-of-mouth approach is one that Carlton United Beverages is also adopting, having learned that big bold advertising does not always work when launching a brand to a younger discerning audience. In 2003, a large TV ad campaign announced the arrival of a new beer, Empire, aimed at much the same drinker as Cut is targeting – 18 to 29-year-olds. The beer flopped.

Viral doesn’t have to be net-based.

3 thoughts on “Vodka selling by word-of-mouth

  1. AdPulp

    Cut The Crap

    from Sidney Morning Herald: Public relations, point of sale, online, event marketing, even a branded pub in a suitably gritty part of town. Every element of the marketing mix was there at the launch of Absolut’s spin-off brand, Cut, bar…

    Reply
  2. Like It Matters

    Absolut Murketing

    Absolut, a brand with one of the most iconic & successful advertising campaigns evah, is launching a new product with *zero* advertising. No advertising in a category that typically buys $3 million in media for a rollout (Australian market). Here’s…

    Reply
  3. Ed

    Here’s my little rant about Absolut Cut – they release this fanstastic ad (the one with the drop of water) which is sexy and makes me want to buy a bottle of the stuff, but then they follow it up with a really bad ad (the one where two people are talking, and there are subtitles of what they really mean to say, and then some guy says ‘cut the crap’). Where’s the consistency? What’s the point putting all this effort in unique design-centric viral marketing, and then ruining it with one of the lamest ads ever? Sorry, but I had to get that off my chest.

    Reply

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